Wednesday, July 10, 2013

SILENCE DAY




"You have had enough of words, I have had enough of words.  It is not through words that I give what I have to give.  In the silence of your perfect surrender, My love, which is always silent, can flow to you - to be yours always to keep and to share with those who seek Me.  When the Word of My Love breaks out of its silence and speaks in your hearts, telling you who I really am, then you will know that that is the Real Word you have been always longing to hear."
Avatar Meher Baba

63 comments:

  1. Reads like the epilogue to Phantom Stranger No. 11.

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    1. I guess all these things intertwine, don't they?

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  2. Not always.

    "Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love."

    Charles M. Schultz

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  3. ... and following up on my just posted comment... .it brings me back to Cassandra Craft. While I am sure you have great plot lines in mind for the future, her feelings for PS could be the springboard of another "big idea" which helps him on his journey of learning and growth.

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  4. Okay Dematteis, a guy comes up to you ans says he wants to know what the best runs are from 1938-now in comics. The run has to be at least 12 issues, and have the name writer throughout. And there can not be any over lap, but after 12 issues you can break it off at any time, you do not have to finish it. What is your answer?


    Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
    Jack

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    1. Hmmm. Right off the bat I'd say FANTASTIC FOUR #44 (the start of the first Inhumans story) through #60 (the end of the Doctor Doom/Silver Surfer classic). In between you got first appearances of Galactus and the Surfer, the Black Panther, the Negative Zone and so much more. It's more than twelve issues, but these comics are the heart and soul of sixties Marvel; hell, of the entire Marvel universe. "Cosmic" was invented here. "Epic" was invented here. And great, human characters at the core of it.

      The Lee-Kirby THOR run of the same period (don't know the #s offhand) was every bit as good: Greek gods, The Colonizers, the High Evolutionary, Ego the Living Planet. Jaw-dropping stuff, issue after issue after issue. (The reason FF rates higher is that Thor himself isn't as interesting a character as Reed, Sue, Johnny and Ben.)

      And if you want a truly mind-boggling run of brilliant, barrier-smashing work, just look at Kirby's first year or so doing NEW GODS/FOREVER PEOPLE/MR. MIRACLE/JIMMY OLSON. More concepts and characters in that one year than most of us come up with in an entire career. Genius unbound!

      I'll think about this some more...!

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    2. The fourth worlds would count as four runs in total.

      But if you do fin thi interesting, why not do the easy thing, start in 1938, and move forward as you feel something else usurps it.


      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    3. Fourth World is a hard call, 'cause in many ways it's one massive story.

      I'm not really an aficionado of pre-sixties comics, so starting in 1938 wouldn't work for me.

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    4. well, let's start with the obvious (as I see it)

      -1938: Superman... be honest the only game in town. A nations hopes are all rolled into one being as it still suffers through the depression and demands a better situation, but fears it may be out of their hands.
      -1939: Marvel Comics. Not the most popular title, but it represents the other side of the depression. Superman is hope the increasing injustices can be stopped, Sub-mariner and the Human Torch are angry that that they exist. The Angel truly despises crime. cathartic reaction.
      -1940: Batman.
      -1941-1945: Captain America/Superman trade off each year(The only time this is okay). The world is at war with seemingly unstoppable forces. An ultimate response is needed. Hope in the world's darkest hour is here in beautiful panel form
      -1945-1952:The Spirit, aside from the obvious high quality, this is the comic that seems to be the epitome of the era. The immediate post war years seem to fit Eisner like a glove.
      -1952-1955: Shock Suspenstories. Not only arguably the best crafted of the EC books, but also a great overview of them. And with the allegory of the sci-fi and horror stories, along with the crime stories given an interesting view of the film noir of the era it is a great view of the era. But the real great is the Impact stories that start in issue 2 which show the faults and prejudices of the era.
      -1955-56: the old Atlas era monster mags. weird I know, but I love 'em. Though that isn't why i pick them. just like the movies they emulate they reflect the time they are created in, in one way or another. But really it as also a reflection of an era in comics, where nothing was really on top. comics were just comics, and selling great by the way, and no one was a bigger part than the other. And it also a time when these only existed.
      -1956-1957: Showcase/The Flash. The Superheroes are back. And ready for the jet age. Sleek, bright, optimistic, and lacking in emotion.
      -1957-1959: SUPERMAN! yes the man of Steel is back on the list, and while just as dull in personality as Flash after his post-war retooling, his stories of the time have something going for them... pure Imagination, that even the most anti-supe reader can't deny.
      -1959-mid/late 1961: Green Lantern. Now one personifies this era better than Hal. He is almost Kennedy with a power ring. He's a war hero, a brave worker in the new most interesting job jet test pilot, he deals with aliens, and he is even in the early days, a bit fixated on the ladies. Hal owned the late 50's and early early 60s.
      -1961-1967: The Fantastic Four. Obvious. A great run. Pure imagination runs wild. The pace race is captured, and new view in comics is in... real personalities. The first dysfunctional family in comics is here. Whats more it acts as a bit of hat teenagers and women are becoming with the invisible girl and Human torch respectfully. The thing is the new breed of hero, not just in comics, but everywhere... flawed.
      -1967: Spider-man. In a way he was the ultimate right place right time character. As the baby boomers reach adolescences and enter college so does Peter Parker. As youth is further expressed, Spider-man is a focus on the changing nation.
      1968-1970: The Silver Surfer. The lofty spiritual and peace/anti-establishment views are focused into one character. The Hippies have their hero! a generation that feels like aliens, and demand to be listened to, and want to change the world can finally truly relate.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    5. wait...

      -1970-1972: Green Lantern/Green Arrow. The age of social relevance has arrived. A young generation is here. For the first time most writers have grown up with comics... and in post-war America. The All in the Family of comics is here. HArd hitting issues with a back drop of the fantastic. Young people now out in the real world wonder after so long saying they want to change the world... is it possible?
      -1973-1974: tough call. either Dr. Strange or Captain Marvel. It has to be one, and both get new starts about the same time. Either way, the cynicism of the decade has arrived. young people are staring to get a bit less hopeful. everything seems dirtier. still looking to spiritual ideas, and to the stars, but not optimistically. Hippies are starting to be a bit less hippie. death and destruction is everywhere, forces of darkness seem almost unconquerable.
      -1974-1975:Man-thing. Cynicism meets social relevance. As the 70s drag on it seems harder and harder to keep the hippie spirit live. A former one reflects his own views, and does not paint a very positive view of humanity.
      -1975-1977: Creepy. Horror is big everywhere this decade. one can guess why and no matter what is will very likely be right. But here is where some of the decades most reflective tales reside. But the reflection is more than that. Almost untouchable. Many have even called it the most important comic of the decade.
      -1978-1980: X-men. All-new all different. Socially relevant, about outcasts, the remaining baby boomer readers can enjoy it as they continue to create modern fandom, as they had been doing for the whole decade. But while this might not be quite right for them, the new breed of teenagers have something to call theirs. Disaffected, and rebelling... yet without a cause to call theirs, only ideas left over from the previous decade that are quickly seeming quaint to them. In an era of vagueness, this is something real.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    6. A great list, Jack. Can't disagree with most of 'em as they all had profound impact on the industry. The Silver Age Superman remains a favorite as does the 60's era Green Lantern.
      Lee-Buscema's run on the Surfer (especially the first six issues) is an all-time favorite of mine.

      The thing with me and the Golden Age comics is that, although I acknowledge their importance, I don't find many of them very readable. Simon and Kirby's work stands out...and the Spirit, certainly. I love the early Superman-Batman stories for their raw power, and their template-changing impact, but, with a few exceptions, none of them are stories I return to for pleasure. (That said, one of my favorite Superman stories of all time is the one where he gets the Army after him so they can destroy and rebuild the Metropolis slums.)

      Speaking of Silver Age: I'd add the Gardner Fox-Mike Sekowskky Justice League run to your list.

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    7. Getting into the 70's (another great list, by the way) I'd add the Wein-Wrightson Swamp Thing run, the Thomas-Smith Conan, Gerber's Defenders and Howard the Duck, Wolfman-Colan's Tomb of Dracula and, for good measure, Englehart's Batman and Justice League, and Moench-Gulacy's Master of Kung Fu.

      Man, the 70's were an amazing decade for comics!

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    8. As for the Golden Age... I'll have to agree. fun stuff. But If I bought a book of say 40's Captain America comics I would probably read one or two a day, where as the 60s Cap I would devour all at once. I like them just fine for what they are, but I certainly wouldn't grab them up to read hard. They are more like really really good comic strips.

      The hardest part of the 70s list was not over lapping. with no overlap what do you do? I really wanted to put Warlock on there, but it ran at the same time as Gerber's Man-thing. That is partially why Captain Marvel is on there. It is to me the weaker when compared to Warlock, but Starlin's style was so important (and great) that it needed to at least be mentioned and Man-thing covered the overarching feel of the 70s better than most.

      So, how about a 80s list Dematteis... TAG, YOUR IT!

      Remember, not JUST quality, also how it represented the times as a mirror.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    9. Wait, Golden age problems? what about the Spirit and E.C.?


      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    10. Starlin's Warlock and Captain Marvel? How could I forget that? I can't tell you how much I loved those books when they were coming out. Fantastic stuff! Jim Starlin took Kirby's Fourth World and moved it forward (or perhaps sideways. Or maybe into another dimension). Y'know, in some ways the 70's were even better than the 60's.
      So much extraordinary work being done.

      As for the 80's: Well, that's when I started working in comics and, once I stopped looking at the material with the innocence of a fan's eyes, something was lost (a lot was gained, but something was definitely lost); so I don't think I could come up with an objective list.

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    11. Re: the Spirit. I've enjoyed those stories and I respect their place in the history of our medium, but it's Eisner's later work—most notably the stunning and brilliant CONTRACT WITH GOD—that bowled me over. As for EC: that was the 50's, so it can't be classified as the Golden Age.

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    12. I think that we have already discussed Starlin's cosmic stuff on this site to some degree. I remember a discussion about whether or not they should be considered cynical.

      The interesting thing about the 70s comics is that it was the first time fans were writing in mass. I think that is part of why it was so diverse. They had been thinking about stories for them before they were getting paid to. For all the talk of Superhero fair dropping in the era, I still find a lot of the stories in the 70s rally interesting. How many I would say have to read is of question, but I certainly can enjoy them.. Maybe I'm just a true fan.

      As for Eisner. I would be lying is I said many of those Spirit stories were as powerful as A Contract With God, but I still think they are genuinly good. And not good for the Golden age... just good. Really amazing stuff.

      As for E.C.... okay Dematteis, you've opened a can of worms here, what are your views on them?
      But, I always thought that The Silver Age was thought to have begun with the intro of Martian Manhunter, which was the same year man E.C. books had to pack it in. I actually always saw the death of E.C. as the official end of the Golden Age.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    13. Yes, I remember that Starlin conversation now, Jack.

      Re: Eisner. Don't get me wrong. I think the Spirit material is terrific, and for its day it was groundbreaking, but it just never hooked me the way his later, more mature work did.

      I always thought the Golden Age ended when the first round of superhero titles died off in the late 40's/early 50's...and that the Silver Age began with the revival of the Flash in the late 50's. Which I guess would make the EC era a kind of No Man's Land.
      Unless someone out there has given that period a name.

      Now I'll have to do some research!

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    14. You should always remember Starlin conversations. By the way, is it just my imagination or was Starlin one of if not the biggest name in the 70s, but especially 80s. I don't know if it is just me zeroing in, or if he was as big as he seems, but I love his 70s, but it seems he was huge in the 80s, and I mean popularity. Just me?

      Technically (according to Wikipedia) thee Golden Age ends in 50, and the silver age in 55 OR 56. Buty it can't work that way. I say it is golden age.

      Now your vies on EC Dematteis, Chop Chop!

      But, I'll have to be carrying the 80s alone, eh? So be it.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    15. 1981-1983: Frank Miller's Daredevil. It is sometimes easy to remember that there was a time when Frank was less... politically motivated. The fact is when he wants to (and it seems he hasn't wanted to in a while) he can be a very effective and thoughtful storyteller. Now, it's hard to tell whether he created this or just perfected it, but gritty comics are Miller's world. And while the 70s where known for their gritty tastes, the 80s had its fair share, but often hidden behind the "morning in America guise" Crime levels where still up. And New York was still deemed a hellhole by many. While much of the decade, especially the begining focused on illusion, or at least focusing on the good. There was no doubt a counteraction in much of the media to this.. even in comedies. This was the comic response. instead of the focus on the best or illusion, this was closer to the man on the streets reality.

      more to come?

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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    16. Never really immersed myself in EC, Jack, although I've read a bunch of stories over the years.

      And, yes, you're on your own in the 80's (just don't forget Moonshadow, Kraven's Last Hunt and JLI!) : )

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    17. Can't argue with Miller's DD...although I prefer his second run, with David Mazuchelli.
      (Hope I spelled that right.) And LOVED the two of them on Batman: Year One.

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  5. wait, wait, wait, I want to repeakl the same writer rule, and add that the idea is to best express the era in comics AS WELL as inovation and quality.


    Jack

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  6. I was a kid in the 80s, so not surprisingly I love that era.

    Looking back, I think what makes it work so well is the tension between conservatism and pushing the envelope. It's not a popular thing to say, but I truly believe the limitations placed on writers--and consequently the ways they dealt with them--made for some of the best superhero stories the medium had ever seen.

    I love Frank Miller's Daredevil stuff, but I couldn't get into his SIN CITY work in the same way. Looking back, it seems like SIN CITY was the story he was dying to tell all along, and that's why he was always pushing the limits on DAREDEVIL. But as dark as his DD stuff was, it's still balanced by an optimism that was, if I speculate correctly, forced upon him. Maybe not explicitly, but it was still seen as a kid's narrative, so there's only so far you can go. The result is...incredible, to say the least.

    KRAVEN'S LAST HUNT is another great example of a work that strikes a balance between 'edgy' and optimistic. Not surprising given the author, but it also seems to sum up what's so great about the era for me. It pushes the envelope without collapsing into the excesses of the 90s (both in form and content).

    As much as I enjoy independent comics, I think mainstream superhero comics lost something they've never quite gotten back from the 90s revolution. When we reached the point where anything goes, maybe we lost the sense that anything could happen. I'm not sure.

    I only know that I increasingly gravitate toward the more traditional storytelling found in stuff like ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN or the more off the wall stuff like LARFLEEZE. But I'm not really as touched by reading mega-arcs where the hero of the title is noticeably absent or relentlessly dark.



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    1. KRAVEN'S LAST HUNT, David? I don't remember that one.

      Joking aside, and speaking as a creator, the 80's were an incredible time of freedom where it seemed that anything was possible. Doing personal projects like MOONSHADOW, BLOOD and GREENBERG THE VAMPIRE, then turning around and doing KRAVEN and the various JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL books, was exhilarating. Each project was totally different from the other and allowed me to stretch in different directions. Experimentation was in the air. But you're right: no one was stretching the Established Icons so far they snapped. KRAVEN pushed Spidey farther than he'd ever been pushed, but never violated the character's core.

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    2. That's what I love about you, JMD. You never push the Icons so far they snap, but you always makes us wonder if you're just crazy enough to do it THIS TIME!

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  7. You know, I guess I should just add that the tension between creativity and order is always a driving force in art, so it's not as though the 80s would be unique in that respect. At the end of the day, the writer is always working with and against limitations, whether it's market forces, the industry culture, or society itself.

    Also, I don't mean to imply that Frank Miller's work has actually suffered, just that SIN CITY didn't blow me away like his Daredevil or Batman stuff. I know a lot of people who vastly prefer SIN CITY and I can see why. It's very well-crafted, just not as much my thing.

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    1. Some days I think I should just turn this whole blog over to you and Jack, David: you guys are so damn interesting! Thanks, as always, to BOTH of you for your thoughtful comments.

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    2. And thanks to you and Jack for making this my favorite internet world!

      Always a great way to start and finish a day on the web..

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  8. Excuse the bias, but I really did love Len Wein's run on Phantom Stranger. It got me hooked on the character for life.

    Have to mention the Alan Moore run on Swamp Thing.

    Back in '60's the Legion of Super-Hero's was a lot of fun. Remember the angst over the death of Lightning Lad?

    Rick

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    1. I agree, Rick: Len's PHANTOM STRANGER run was terrific. And wasn't most of it drawn by the great Jim Aparo? Can't argue with Moore's SWAMP THING...and Rick Veitch did a sensational job writing the book after Alan.

      And, yes, I certainly do remember the death of Lightning Lad!

      Thanks for checking in!

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    2. Yes, PS was drawn by Aparo. I have one of his pages (as well as Adams).

      We never did learn the mystery of why the medallion image went from the "broccoli floret" to the "compass star." It's a shame PS is such a serious book it has no room for some silly explanation about it. (and, will the medallion ever make its return?)

      Rick

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    3. I remain a huge fan of Aparo's work, Rick. Sorry I never got to work with him. What a talent! I should go back and reread some of those classic Wein-Aparo stories.

      As for the medallion...no plans to address the issue, but, hey, you never know!

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  9. Let me add a few more series: the revival of Airboy, and Concrete. The former brought back the kind of daydreams of what kids must have had in the 1940's. The latter was a brilliant intellectual exercise of the mind.

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    1. I'm familiar with CONCRETE, but I've never read AIRBOY. What's it about?

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    2. The set-up may seem a little dreary on its own. What makes Airboy "work" is the artwork in combination with the plot (like the way the Rocketeer is so well served by the arwork). Here are some clips from http://www.comicvine.com/airboy/4005-1432/. The plane, by the way, uses flapping batlike wings, is named "Birdie" and is almost sentient.

      Golden Age version:
      "The son of a skilled pilot, Davy Nelson was raised around planes, and soon showed himself to be an exceptionally skilled pilot in his own right. He was close friends with a Franciscan monk, Brother Francis Martier, who was himself a keen flyer. Martier invented a revolutionary new plane, but died during its testing. The plane was left to Davy, as was a uniform that had allegedly been in Martier's family for over a century. Wearing the costume and flying the plane left to him, Davy became Airboy.

      Revival:
      "Davy is assassinated by South American mercenaries, which prompts his son to investigate. His son discovers his father's history as Airboy, as well as locating his plane and costume. The boy takes up the mantle of Airboy and continues his father's tradition of adventuring and crime fighting."

      Rick

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    3. Thanks for the info, Rick. I get the sense that I'd have to read it to get the full effect because, from what you say, the magic seems to be in the execution. I'll check out those clips today!

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    4. I must say, I'm impressed the way you keep up with this stuff on your blog.

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    5. The thing I love the most about Creation Point (and Twitter, as well), Rick, is that I get to have a place where I can talk, one on one, with people who've followed my work. It's a great source of pleasure for me.

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    6. Creation Point is great. You just have to watch out for the Laord of the Hunt and his hound!

      LARFLEEZE #2 was a fantastic read, BTW. It's very liberating to have a cosmic book that features compelling characters without much baggage. I honestly have no idea where it's going...but it's a fun ride.

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    7. "A fun ride" is what we're aiming for with LARFLEEZE, David. Very glad you're enjoying it.

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    8. And I'll just add that the colors on LARFLEEZE really pop in high-defintion digital format! Seriously beautiful stuff, particuarly the Laord of the Hunt's 'glow' effect.

      On another note, I find it odd that CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN and KAMANDI is Kirby's only digitized DC work so far. I would have guessed FOURTH WORLD would get the quicker treatment...

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    9. No digital Fourth World? No Demon? That's very surprising. That said, I'm sure it will all be rolled out over time...

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    10. Yeah, I'm sure it will, too. But I find some of these choices odd. Kind of like how Marvel rolled out a Roger Stern Visionaries TPB that focused on his lesser known PETER PARKER, THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN work instead of his legendary ASM run. But with John Byrne they rolled out his FF run first. When that sold well, they went back and printed a Volume 0 that collected his FF stuff from MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE and MARVEL TEAM-UP.

      While I haven't read CHALLENGERS OF THE UNKNOWN, I can't help but think it suffers from the inevitable comparison to the heights his FF run achieved.

      But hey, if I were in charge there would be a digital JMD/Buscema omnibus!

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    11. Well, then, I hope you're in charge soon, David!

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    12. From your mouth to God's ears! :)

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    13. "The thing I love the most about Creation Point (and Twitter, as well), Rick, is that I get to have a place where I can talk, one on one, with people who've followed my work. It's a great source of pleasure for me."

      I know exactly what you mean. I do a newsletter for my clients, and I know it's well liked by it's readership level and retention rate (people show me copies they saved for over 6 years). But usually, it's like an echo chamber. If I received more comments, I could better calibrate my topics and writing. Rick

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    14. I spend so much of my time alone in a room playing with my imaginary friends, that I sometimes forget there are actual people out there reading, and responding to, my work.
      When I go to conventions, when people post comments here or contact me on Twitter, it opens up the world for me. And I'm deeply grateful.

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  10. "I spend so much of my time alone in a room playing with my imaginary friends,..."

    Just don't start setting out little tea cups for them and offering them some imaginary cookies. :-)

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    1. What do you mean "start"?! : )

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    2. JM, Rick here.

      Let me begin by stating I am not your typical reader. I am the same age as you; I am a professional (a lawyer); I have a family, and a full life. I actually “retired” from comic book reading over 20 years ago because they just weren’t that interesting. I came back because of my intrigue at the return of the Phantom Stranger.

      The primary reason for my fascination with the character is that he did not fight the same fight as other characters. Most heros fight “the acts of evil”: the bank robber, the world dominator, the cosmic vampire and so forth. The classic Len Wein version fought the “intent of evil.” That is, a character would be placed in a morally or ethically challenging situation and PS would try to convince the character to stay on the side of right. That fight is not won by fists but by talking and reasoning (something WW doesn’t seem to “get” in Trinity of Sin). So, while PS could whip the tar out of a bad guy if need be, knocking out the bad guy wouldn’t help convince the character in need to pick the right path. As another blogger once wrote, PS was proof that the universe really did give a sh*t. With comics just moving out of the camp phase when PS had his run, I believe the book was way ahead of its time.

      I think the current version of PS is headed towards that direction, but I would like to see more of a focus on this aspect of the character. His moral compass should be more internalized. He should assist others to walk his righteous path. And, I would like to see him convince the Holy Terrier to change its view—and be right (in the Old Testament, G-d’s initial intentions were sometimes altered by characters). Comic readers these days are sophisticated enough, I think, to appreciate that sort of fight. Since you’ve been on board, chatter on the web has been great and PS’s sales last issue moved up. I don’t think it’s just due to those three little words: Trinity of Sin.

      By the way, my gmail address is Rick2you2@gmail.com. I don’t mind sharing comments or my identity. I just don’t want it aggregated on Facebook, Google + or somewhere else.

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    3. "Proof that the universe really does give a shit." Well, that certainly resonates with my view of life, Rick. And I agree that it's a fascinating take on the character. In a way, the current incarnation of PS is on his way to embracing that paradigm, but he's still got a long way to go. That said, there's more to the character than we've seen and I look forward to broadening the view of just who he is and what his Cosmic Role is.

      In the end, I'm not interested in stories that paint a bleak and negative view of life, of God, of our place in the universe, so you can expect PHANTOM STRANGER to reflect those themes you talk about, although not in the same way they did back in the 70's.

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  11. You're right, he shouldn't be bleak, or negative. I think that's one of the points you had the Holy Terrier try to make to him. His path is supposed to be a good one--that should embrace joy.

    Nevertheless, I think his serious side makes sense. In many ways, his role is more exhausting and has greater consequences than that of a typical superhero. Beating up a bad guy and "rising up" after a setback, in typical superhero mold, takes physical strength and character. But, old PS was expected to determine the righteous path, to convince someone to follow it, and sometimes, feel the emotional agony of losing a soul when he failed. Bleak, no. Serious, yes.

    I don't know if it's intentional, but one of the broader points I see in "Trinity of Sin" is how dumb a basic superhero is. When confronted by something which is morally complex (Superman killing), they show no collective wisdom. They just rush out in teams without recognizing that a little caution would be a wise idea. That's an area where old PS would probably excel.

    By the way, I'd like to see PS have a good day and smile.

    Rick

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    1. I'll do my best to bring that about, Rick.

      And thanks for sharing your thoughts about the book. They're very much appreciated!

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    2. You're welcome.

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  12. On a different note, perhaps one of the artists could explain another great mystery to me: PS's front zipper (at least I think that's what it is). If the 30 pieces of silver are attached to his body, how does the shirt get underneath it even with the zipper? Rick

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    1. Some things must remain Cosmic Mysteries!

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  13. Clearly, Phantom Stranger traveled across universes to borrow some unstable molecules from Reed Richards! :)

    Very interesting and enjoyable analysis of PS, Rick. There's really nothing else like this book on the market right now. I like that it's kind of in its own corner of the DCU, but still able to pull from the shared universe. Honestly, it's PS, so there's no real reason he couldn't travel the multiverse if he really wanted to. I've been a little disappointed that DC hasn't done much with that (starting with the idea of limiting, um, unlimited universes to an even 52). PS should totally show up in an issue of ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN and just have a cup of coffee in a cosmic cafe with Golden and Silver Age Superman. And BIRTHRIGHT Superman, who was totally robbed, because Mark Waid's take was only canon for like five minutes.

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    1. I LOVE the idea of PS traveling through the various iterations of the DCU, David! Maybe one of these days...!

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    2. Or better yet, he could enter a Looney Tunes cartoon! Surely Daffy Duck's been waiting a long time to tell Judas Iscariot, "You're despicable!"

      Daffy has actually teamed up with the Green Lantern Corp, and it was pretty cool:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5Bg6Un8_SQ

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    3. I've done some pretty weird stories in my day, David, but Daffy Duck meets Judas just might be too weird for me! : )

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    4. I would absolutely buy that.

      By the way, David, I resp0onded to some of your thought here on the more recent topic.

      Wishing you nothing, but goodwill and hipness from here to the stars,
      Jack

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